Harry Sierman

The 1940s Life: Harry Sierman (1927-2007) was the oldest of five children from his father’s second marriage. A hosiery trader, his father was comfortably off and living the good, quiet life with his family at 68 Keizersgracht in Amsterdam’s predominantly roman-catholic neighborhood.  At one time he and his brothers were watching the news bulletin in the

Frans Spruijt

When he was still a printer, Frans Spruijt (1923-2009) was devoted to always deliver the highest quality and willing to be engaged with exceptional projects. The remarkable Spruijt calendars, the exhibitions he organized in his printing house and many, many of the publications he produced gave testimony of this devotion, his love of type setting to perfection

Swip Stolk

Swip Stolk’s (1944-2019) career started at age fifteen when he entered employment of an advertising agency. He dropped out of graphic school and Gerrit Rietveld Academy’s evening class, for he didn’t want to have anything to do with conventions and couldn’t stand the academic character of the studies. Others might be ashamed of not having

Henk Gianotten

During the first conversation Henk Gianotten (1940) and I had for this publication, I became aware immediately that he can still be found smack in the middle of the graphic profession’s action. Our discussion hardly paid attention to the past; it was as if looking back was not yet an option. Instead we talked much

Ben Bos

In 1978 Ben Bos (1930-2017) was invited to become a member of AGI, Alliance Graphique Internationale, a select group of international designers. For Bos this was a glorious occasion: it indicated he was recognized to be one of the world’s leading designers; he was allowed entrance to the design professionals’ Pantheon. It was not his

Paul Mertz

Amsterdam, Victorieplein, Berlage’s statue, the streetcars, the ‘Wolkenkrabber’ (skyscraper). The place where Paul Mertz (1938) was born, to which he returned and where he now lives and works for quite some time already. A Sunday’s child. A consultant, says the sign on his office’s window. A stimulator of young artists and designers, and still active.

Benno Wissing

It is the end of February 2006. I just received the portraits of Benno made by Jan van Toorn during his visit to Providence, Rhode Island. Stylistically, they are perfectly matched with the profiles created by Aatjan Renders for the Roots publications. The winter of 2005-06 on the East Coast of the United States had

Gerard Unger

It is October 10, 1974. Gerard Unger (1942-2018) takes the train from Bussum in the Netherlands to Kiel in Germany. He is on his way to meet Herr Peter Käpernick of Hell’s Schriftabteilung, Hell being the company that invented the Digiset typesetting machine. Digiset creates type by drawing small lines of light at a high speed across photosensitive paper.

Anthon Beeke

Graphic designer Anthon Beeke (1940-2018) is a street artist of a unique kind. A Beeke poster is almost always a provocation of the public space due to his disturbing choice of images cut so tight that they threaten to burst out of their setting. His posters present nude, vulnerable, imperfect and wounded bodies and details

Paul Hefting

Designers knew Paul Hefting (1933-2018) as “postzegelpaultje” (Mr Stamp) of the Dienst Esthetische Vormgeving DEV (Department of Esthetic Design) at PTT, later KPN, from whom they might receive the much desired commission to create a new postage stamp and who would guide them through the process. Other people knew him as the diligent author of

Bob Noorda

Born in Amsterdam in 1927, Bob Noorda attended what was then called ‘commercial art class’ at the Instituut voor Kunstnijverheidsonderwijs (IvKnO), also in Amsterdam, in 1950 and 1951. Although Bauhaus was much admired at the IvKnO, the education program was geared to practical implementation. Noorda was fine with this approach. Having lost three valuable years

Eugene Bay

Travelling is in Eugene Bay’s blood. His father worked for the diplomatic service of Great Britain in various capitals all over the world. Until his eleventh year, Eugene (now 65) lived successively in Turkey, Italy, India and Singapore. He then went to boarding school at Rodbourne College, near Newport Pagnell in England. At school he

Jan van Toorn

November 9, 1972. Museum Fodor’s large hall was full of people. At the occasion of the exhibition of Jan van Toorn’s designs, this museum on Amsterdam’s Keizersgracht had organized a debate between him and his colleague Wim Crouwel. Their contrasting opinions about graphic design had attracted the public’s attention. While Crouwel expressed his belief in

Walter Nikkels

Walter Nikkels was educated at Rotterdam’s Academie van Beeldende Kunsten, where he studied at the department of ‘Decorative and Monumental Arts’. It taught the concept of ‘community art’, of a ‘designed art’ in the 1950s. Nikkels graduated after four years. Early monumental commissions gave him the fiscal freedom to continue studying painting at the Akademie der Bildenden

Each two weeks a new article

More to come Henk Gianotten, Frans Spruijt, Harry Sierman, Gerrit Noordzij, Baer Cornet, Cor Rosbeek, Wim Crouwel, Susanne Heynemann, Kees Nieuwenhuijzen, Ad Werner, Hein van Haaren, Ootje Oxenaar, Guus Ros, Simon den Hartog, Ben Harsta, Karel Treebus, Henk van Stokkom, Dick Bruna, Bart de Groot, Daphne Duijvelshoff van Peski, Rob Huisman, Will van Sambeek, Bart